zeldathemes
I think
Thus Maybe I Am


A small and practical news feed for scientific fields (focusing on physics and psychology), economics, finance, news and actuality. In this short-form blog you will find all the information I manage to digest daily, alongside my opinion.
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ourtimeorg:

Disturbing. ‪#‎ActOnClimate‬. Vote.

ourtimeorg:

Disturbing. ‪#‎ActOnClimate‬. Vote.

jumbiz:

MH17: U.S. Points Finger at Russia, Russia Deflects Blame - WallStreetJournal

Yeah, right, Russia. 

ucsdhealthsciences:

A University of California, San Diego School of Medicine-led study suggests that parents of obese children often do not recognize the potentially serious health consequences of childhood weight gain or the importance of daily physical activity in helping their child reach a healthy weight.

The study is published online in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

“Parents have a hard time changing their child’s dietary and physical activity behaviors,” said lead author Kyung Rhee, MD, and an assistant adjunct professor in the Department of Pediatrics. “Our study tells us what factors may be associated with a parent’s motivation to help their child become more healthy.”

The study is based on a survey of 202 parents whose children were enrolled in an obesity clinic at the Hasbro Children’s Hospital in Providence, Rhode Island in 2008 and 2009. The survey probed parents’ readiness to take actionable steps to improve their child’s eating habits and physical activity levels. The children ranged in age from 5 to 20 years old, with an average age of 13.8 years. More than two-thirds were female, and almost all (94 percent) were clinically classified as obese.

Although most of the children had been referred to the obesity clinic by a primary care provider and had metabolic markers of obesity, 31.4 percent of parents perceived their child’s health as excellent or very good and 28 percent did not perceive their child’s weight as a health concern.

Parents indicated a greater interest in helping their child eat a healthy diet than encouraging the pediatrician-recommended hour of daily physical activity.

Specifically, 61.4 percent of parents reported that they were improving their child’s eating habits (less junk food, more fruits and vegetables) while only 41.1 percent said they were increasing their child’s involvement in active play, sports, dancing or even walking. Both diet and exercise are considered keys to good health, and a growing body of evidence suggests that these health habits are formed early in life.

Parents who had talked with their primary care physician about healthy eating strategies were more likely to be in the “action stage of change” with their child’s diet. By contrast, parents who viewed their own battle with weight as a health concern were less likely to be addressing their child’s eating habits.

The researchers said education, income and race/ethnicity had no statistically significant bearing on a parent’s likelihood of making dietary changes for their child.

In terms of physical activity, researchers do not know why parents appear to under-emphasize its role in good health, but the finding is consistent with other recent studies that suggest America’s youth are largely out-of-shape and sedentary, replacing playtime with “screen time.”

Experts say one strategy to counteract the trend may be to intervene early. Parents with children 14 or older were much less likely to be successful in helping their child develop a physical dimension to their life than parents of younger children.

Poverty may also play a role in how much children move on a daily basis, as parents with annual incomes of less than $40,000 were also less likely to be actively engaged in ensuring their child got regular exercise.

justinacuff:

"A psychopath is a person who, unfortunately for him or her, lacks the ability to really empathize with other human beings. When they look around, they don’t see other human beings with deep, rich, three-dimensional personal lives and aims and ambitions.What they see is cardboard cutouts, and it’s very sad and it’s very lonely, and it’s very rare, fortunately.

But actually, aren’t most of us not really so very good at empathy? Oh sure, we’re very good at empathy when it’s a question of dealing with people who kind of look like us and kind of walk and talk and eat and pray and wear like us, but when it comes to people who don’t do that, who don’t quite dress like us and don’t quite pray like us and don’t quite talk like us, do we not also have a tendency to see them ever so slightly as cardboard cutouts too? And this is a question we need to ask ourselves. I think constantly we have to monitor it. Are we and our politicians to a degree cultural psychopaths?”

— Simon Anholt, “Which Country Does The Most Good For The World?

scienceyoucanlove:

Tropical fish are invading and destroying kelp forestsSCIENCEALERT STAFF   
WEDNESDAY, 09 JULY 2014
They might be beautiful, but migrating tropical fish are consuming more than their fair share of kelp and seagrass.
A study by Australian researchers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) has found evidence of the harmful impact of tropical fish migrating off the coast of the US, Japan, the eastern Mediterranean, and Australia.
As a result of the ocean warming, tropical fish including unicornfish, parrotfish and rabbitfish are moving to new temperate areas, where they overgraze on the kelp forests and seagrass meadows that line the ocean floor. 
“The tropicalisation of temperate marine areas is a new phenomenon of global significance that has arisen because of climate change,” said marine ecologist and lead author of the study,Adriana Verges, in a press release. “Increases in the number of plant-eating tropical fish can profoundly alter ecosystems and lead to barren reefs, affecting the biodiversity of these regions, with significant economic and management impacts.”
The study has been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.
The researchers discovered that hotspots are developing in particular ocean regions that move warm tropical waters towards the poles. In the East Australian Current, which moves warm water from the tropical Coral Sea down the east coast of Australia, the waters are warming at two to three times the global average. This means tropical fish have become common in Sydney Harbour during the summer months.
Similar effects have been seen in Japan, the east coast of the US, northern Brazil and south eastern Africa.
“In tropical regions, a wide diversity of plant-eating fish perform the vital role of keeping reefs free of large seaweeds, allowing corals to flourish. But when they intrude into temperate waters they pose a significant threat to these habitats. They can directly overgraze algal forests as well as prevent the recovery of algae that have been damaged for other reasons,” said Verges.
from Science Alert 

scienceyoucanlove:

Tropical fish are invading and destroying kelp forestsSCIENCEALERT STAFF   

WEDNESDAY, 09 JULY 2014

They might be beautiful, but migrating tropical fish are consuming more than their fair share of kelp and seagrass.

A study by Australian researchers at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) has found evidence of the harmful impact of tropical fish migrating off the coast of the US, Japan, the eastern Mediterranean, and Australia.

As a result of the ocean warming, tropical fish including unicornfish, parrotfish and rabbitfish are moving to new temperate areas, where they overgraze on the kelp forests and seagrass meadows that line the ocean floor. 

“The tropicalisation of temperate marine areas is a new phenomenon of global significance that has arisen because of climate change,” said marine ecologist and lead author of the study,Adriana Verges, in a press release. “Increases in the number of plant-eating tropical fish can profoundly alter ecosystems and lead to barren reefs, affecting the biodiversity of these regions, with significant economic and management impacts.”

The study has been published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

The researchers discovered that hotspots are developing in particular ocean regions that move warm tropical waters towards the poles. In the East Australian Current, which moves warm water from the tropical Coral Sea down the east coast of Australia, the waters are warming at two to three times the global average. This means tropical fish have become common in Sydney Harbour during the summer months.

Similar effects have been seen in Japan, the east coast of the US, northern Brazil and south eastern Africa.

“In tropical regions, a wide diversity of plant-eating fish perform the vital role of keeping reefs free of large seaweeds, allowing corals to flourish. But when they intrude into temperate waters they pose a significant threat to these habitats. They can directly overgraze algal forests as well as prevent the recovery of algae that have been damaged for other reasons,” said Verges.

from Science Alert 

amnhnyc:

Astronomers have long pondered the origins of enormous elliptical galaxies in the young Universe. An object 11 billion light-years away spotted by the Herschel mission may help unravel the mystery. 
Two massive spiral galaxies merged to create a giant elliptical galaxy, which were previously believed to form through the absorption of dwarf galaxies over time. 
Learn more about this finding in a Science Bulletin video. 

amnhnyc:

Astronomers have long pondered the origins of enormous elliptical galaxies in the young Universe. An object 11 billion light-years away spotted by the Herschel mission may help unravel the mystery. 

Two massive spiral galaxies merged to create a giant elliptical galaxy, which were previously believed to form through the absorption of dwarf galaxies over time. 

Learn more about this finding in a Science Bulletin video

bitcoinpulse:

Price opened above weekly pivot 617, price bias for uptrend to 630, need to wait as market really ‘flat’ #btc

bitcoinpulse:

Price opened above weekly pivot 617, price bias for uptrend to 630, need to wait as market really ‘flat’ #btc

neurosciencestuff:

Scientists find new clues to brain’s wiring
New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These connections, or synapses, allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body.
Reporting online in Neuron, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a group of proteins that program a common type of brain nerve cell to connect with another type of nerve cell in the brain.
The finding is an important step forward in efforts to learn how the developing brain is built, an area of research essential to understanding the causes of intellectual disability and autism.
“We now are looking at how loss of this wiring affects brain function in mice,” said senior author Azad Bonni, MD, PhD, the Edison Professor of Neurobiology and head of the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology at the School of Medicine.
Bonni and his colleagues are studying synapses in the cerebellum, a region of the brain that sits in the back of the head. The cerebellum plays a central role in controlling the coordination of movement and is essential for what researchers call procedural motor learning, which makes it possible to move our muscles at an unconscious level, such as when we ride a bicycle or play the piano.
“The cerebellum also regulates mental functions,” Bonni said. “So, impairment of the wiring of nerve cells in the cerebellum may contribute to movement disorders as well as cognitive problems including autism spectrum disorders.”
His new results show that a complex of proteins known as NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase) plays a fairly high supervisory role in some aspects of the cerebellum’s construction. When the researchers blocked the NuRD complex, cells in the cerebellum called granule cells failed to form connections with other nerve cells, the Purkinje neurons. These circuits are important for the cerebellum’s control of movement coordination and learning.
Bonni and his colleagues showed that NuRD exerts influence at the epigenetic level, which means it controls factors other than DNA that affect gene activity. For example, NuRD affects the configurations of molecules that store DNA and that can open and close the coils of DNA like an accordion, making genes less or more accessible. Changing the accessibility of genes changes their activity levels. For instance, cells can’t frequently make proteins from genes in a tightly packed coil of DNA.
NuRD also alters tags on the proteins that store DNA, decreasing the chances that the gene will be used. Among the genes deactivated by NuRD are two that control the activity of other genes involved in the wiring of the cerebellum.
“This tells us that the NuRD complex is very influential—not only does it affect the activity of genes directly, it also controls other regulators of multiple genes,” Bonni said.
(Image: Courtesy of VJ Wedeen and LL Wald, Martinos Center, Harvard Medical School, Human Connectome Project)

neurosciencestuff:

Scientists find new clues to brain’s wiring

New research provides an intriguing glimpse into the processes that establish connections between nerve cells in the brain. These connections, or synapses, allow nerve cells to transmit and process information involved in thinking and moving the body.

Reporting online in Neuron, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have identified a group of proteins that program a common type of brain nerve cell to connect with another type of nerve cell in the brain.

The finding is an important step forward in efforts to learn how the developing brain is built, an area of research essential to understanding the causes of intellectual disability and autism.

“We now are looking at how loss of this wiring affects brain function in mice,” said senior author Azad Bonni, MD, PhD, the Edison Professor of Neurobiology and head of the Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology at the School of Medicine.

Bonni and his colleagues are studying synapses in the cerebellum, a region of the brain that sits in the back of the head. The cerebellum plays a central role in controlling the coordination of movement and is essential for what researchers call procedural motor learning, which makes it possible to move our muscles at an unconscious level, such as when we ride a bicycle or play the piano.

“The cerebellum also regulates mental functions,” Bonni said. “So, impairment of the wiring of nerve cells in the cerebellum may contribute to movement disorders as well as cognitive problems including autism spectrum disorders.”

His new results show that a complex of proteins known as NuRD (nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase) plays a fairly high supervisory role in some aspects of the cerebellum’s construction. When the researchers blocked the NuRD complex, cells in the cerebellum called granule cells failed to form connections with other nerve cells, the Purkinje neurons. These circuits are important for the cerebellum’s control of movement coordination and learning.

Bonni and his colleagues showed that NuRD exerts influence at the epigenetic level, which means it controls factors other than DNA that affect gene activity. For example, NuRD affects the configurations of molecules that store DNA and that can open and close the coils of DNA like an accordion, making genes less or more accessible. Changing the accessibility of genes changes their activity levels. For instance, cells can’t frequently make proteins from genes in a tightly packed coil of DNA.

NuRD also alters tags on the proteins that store DNA, decreasing the chances that the gene will be used. Among the genes deactivated by NuRD are two that control the activity of other genes involved in the wiring of the cerebellum.

“This tells us that the NuRD complex is very influential—not only does it affect the activity of genes directly, it also controls other regulators of multiple genes,” Bonni said.

(Image: Courtesy of VJ Wedeen and LL Wald, Martinos Center, Harvard Medical School, Human Connectome Project)

saharareporters:

We Are Yet To Call Off Our Strike – COEASU Unlike the Academic Staff Union of Polytechnic (ASUP) that is expected to resume work on Tuesday after suspending its ten months strike, the Colleges of Education Academic Staff Union (COEASU) said on Sunday that it was yet to call off its seven months old strike.The General Secretary of COEASU, Nuhu Ogirima, who gave the indication in an interview in Abuja, said the union would end the strike only after a clear-cut commitment towards meeting the remaining part of their demands has been made by the Federal Government (FG).READ MORE…

saharareporters:

We Are Yet To Call Off Our Strike – COEASU

Unlike the Academic Staff Union of Polytechnic (ASUP) that is expected to resume work on Tuesday after suspending its ten months strike, the Colleges of Education Academic Staff Union (COEASU) said on Sunday that it was yet to call off its seven months old strike.

The General Secretary of COEASU, Nuhu Ogirima, who gave the indication in an interview in Abuja, said the union would end the strike only after a clear-cut commitment towards meeting the remaining part of their demands has been made by the Federal Government (FG).

READ MORE…

sniperj0e:

the 3D on this thing is unreal

sniperj0e:

the 3D on this thing is unreal

bitcoinpulse:

I’m expecting Bitcoin to hit $700 in about a month, and then we’ll see it go through the motions of another bubble. If it’s history and behavior repeats itself, I guess you might expect it to hit $5,000 then crash down to around ~$2500 when it stabilizes after the bubble/crash cycle. Anyone else think otherwise?  #BTC #Satoshi

bitcoinpulse:

I’m expecting Bitcoin to hit $700 in about a month, and then we’ll see it go through the motions of another bubble. If it’s history and behavior repeats itself, I guess you might expect it to hit $5,000 then crash down to around ~$2500 when it stabilizes after the bubble/crash cycle. Anyone else think otherwise?
#BTC #Satoshi

bitcoinpulse:

#statism #government

bitcoinpulse:

#statism #government

mothernaturenetwork:

DARPA developing brain implants to restore memoriesThe research to help treat traumatic brain injuries is part of the broader BRAIN Initiative, the 12-year brain-mapping effort launched in 2013.

mothernaturenetwork:

DARPA developing brain implants to restore memories
The research to help treat traumatic brain injuries is part of the broader BRAIN Initiative, the 12-year brain-mapping effort launched in 2013.

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

In their latest video, Gavin and Dan of The Slow Mo Guys demonstrate what giant bubbles look like in high-speed video from birth to death. Surface tension, which arises from the imbalance of intermolecular forces across the soapy-water/air interface, is the driving force for bubbles. As they move the wand, cylindrical sheets of bubble film form. These bubble tubes undulate in part because of the motion of air around them. In a cylindrical form, surface tension cannot really counteract these undulations. Instead it drives the film toward break-up into multiple spherical bubbles. You can see examples of that early in the video. The second half of the video shows the deaths of these large bubble tubes when they don’t manage to pinch off into bubbles. The soap film tears away from the wand and the destructive front propagates down the tube, tearing the film into fluid ligaments and tiny droplets (most of which are not visible in the video). Instead it looks almost as if a giant eraser is removing the outer bubble tube, which is a pretty awesome effect.  (Video credit: The Slow Mo Guys)